All About Daily Mississippi News

Heavy Bleeding Due to Boric Acid Suppositories

Jan 12

Heavy bleeding is one of the side effects of boric acid suppositories. It can cause severe internal hemorrhaging if not treated immediately. This results in blood clots in the lungs, kidneys, heart, and other organs. A bleeding disorder can also cause bleeding problems.

Heavy bleeding, or menorrhagia, is the medical term used to describe the excessive menstrual flow. The average woman needs to change her sanitary pads or tampons every 3-4 hours, however, there are some women who will need to change their protection more frequently. There are also those women who need to use several pads during a single day. There are times when the menstrual flow is so heavy that women need to use overnight pads, or tampons with added protection during the night.

Heavy bleeding may be caused by abnormalities of the vagina, uterus, hormones, liver, and other reproductive organs. Sometimes it has no obvious cause. There are several common causes of heavy bleeding. It can be due to infections, polyps, cancers, and vagina problems. It may also result from taking birth control pills or other medicines that alter the menstrual cycle. In some cases, it is a sign of pregnancy.

Side Effects of Boric Acid Suppositories

Heavy bleeding is one of the side effects of boric suppositories. It can cause severe internal hemorrhaging if not treated immediately. This results in blood clots in the lungs, kidneys, heart, and other organs. A bleeding disorder may also cause heavy bleeding.

Heavy vaginal bleeding—bleeding that soaks a pad or tampon every hour for 2 or more hours—is a common problem women face during their menstrual cycle. Although heavy bleeding may be normal during the first few days of your period if it persists for more than a couple of hours after you use up all your pads or tampons, seek medical help. This lessens your risk of anemia through blood loss. A common cause for this condition is vagina problems.

Before using boric acid suppositories, tell your doctor if you are taking any medicines for anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, heartburn, ulcers, or diabetes, or any other condition. Do not start or stop any medicines without your doctor's approval. If you are taking any of these products, tell your doctor before you start taking boric acid suppositories. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. It is not known whether boric acid suppositories will harm an unborn baby. If you become pregnant while taking these medications, talk with your doctor about registering with the National Pregnancy Registry for Boric Acid Suppositories. Talk with your doctor first before using any other prescribed or over-the-counter medications, including vitamins and supplements.